News

18 November 2019

Bioenergy in Lithuania: Status quo and the future

Photo: Dovile Zdanaviciene, Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Lithuania

Dovile Zdanaviciene is Head of the policy group, of the Climate Change management team, in the Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Lithuania. She studied Environmental Engineering and Energy Engineering / Thermal Engineering at the Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. Expertise: renewable energy, policies and climate change mitigation, policy measures.

What role does bioenergy play in Lithuania and the Baltic Sea Region’s energy system? What were the main trends?

Starting last year, the national parliament adopted a new energy strategy, boosting the production and promoting the use of energy from renewable resources. In addition, the efficient use of energy as part of the national strategy has become stronger overall.
By 2030, we will already be seeing the greening of the electricity, heating and transport sectors. However, the main task is to shift to a waste based feedstock use for the production of bioenergy when considering transport because PV and wind resources are already there for the electricity production.

What changes do you foresee in Lithuania when considering the bioenergy sector? Which bioenergy products will be the most viable? Why?

We see problems regarding reaching renewable targets in the transport sector in the future. At this time we are very low in target goals for renewable fuels for transport. As an example, biomethane in transport needs an improved infrastructure, (refilling stations), vehicles (engines) and political regulations, incentives. Due to these issues, we as Ministry together with other ministries are preparing a new draft law for the parliament, in order to establish the framework boosting these new technologies.

There are currently many environmental, economic and social concerns regarding the biomass use for energy production. Do you foresee the implementation of restrictions (prohibitions, taxes, etc.) that would directly influence the renewable energy market uptake?

Indeed, the environmental, economic and social pillars have already been tackled by EU policies and their national implementations. These regulations set the sustainability criteria for the used biomass. In fact, the EU has defined sustainability criteria for biofuels and liquid biofuels in the 2009 Renewable Energies Directive (2009/28/EC) with respect to the protection of climate and biodiversity. Sustainability criteria could be summarised as “no production areas” (e.g. biomass cannot be produced on primary forest, peatlands, wetlands or high biodiversity lands, etc.). Additionally, the RED (2009/28/EC) includes the national overall targets for the share of energy from renewable sources and the rules for calculating GHG impacts producing biomass. Furthermore, sustainability criteria are still being improved through voluntary schemes.

 

Full report on the analysis of market outlook and future viability of different bioenergy products and value chains in the Baltic Sea Region energy system can be found here.

Other news

Postponed conference: From Thinking Globally to Acting Locally

24 February 2020

International Scientific Conference “Sustainable Bioeconomy Development 2020: From Thinking Globally to Acting Locally” in Kaunas, Lithuania. The conference is organized by our project partners: the Faculty of Bioeconomy Development of Vytautas Magnus University Agriculture Academy and the Faculty of Economics and Social Development of Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies. In relation to the […]

2# Newsletter BalticBiomass4Value

30 January 2020

Dear readers, FNR, as communication manager of BalticBiomass4Value, is proud to announce that the 2nd newsletter of the project has been published recently. This issue covers a “Report on the Analysis of the Consumption, Prices and Energy Production from the various Biomass Sources in the Baltic Sea Region”. The report is accompanied by an interview […]

Opening Conference of the BalticBiomass4Value project held during the Baltic Bioeconomy Days in Rostock on 11 – 12 March 2020

20 March 2020

The BalticBiomass4Value project aims to enhance capacity of public and private actors within the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) in order to produce bioenergy in a more environmentally sustainable and economically viable way by utilising new biomass resources (primarily, biological waste) for energy production. This also includes the existing potentials to utilise bioenergy side streams for […]